Glossary

Vocabulary that holds the terms for the vocabulary.

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S-VHS:search for term

Super VHS. Enhancement to regular VHS that offers improved luminance resolution. (400 lines or so.)

S-Videosearch for term

See Y/C.

Saturationsearch for term

The intensity of the color is called saturation. It is the distance away from the "black body curve" on the CIE diagram. Color saturation on a display device is controlled by the Color control. Apparent saturation of colors in a picture can be effected by the luminance value of the signal. Color saturation is measured on a vectorscope by the distance away from the center of the scope display

Scalingsearch for term

This is done to zoom an image on the screen without spreading out the existing scan lines, or to change the video from one format to another with a different number of scan lines, for example HDTV to NTSC or NTSC to SECAM.

Scan Linessearch for term

The lines drawn by an electron gun in a CRT system to make up the picture. Drawn horizontally, from left to right, starting at the top left and working to the bottom right. See also Lines of Horizontal Resolution.

Screen gainsearch for term

Screen gain describes the extent to which a projection screen can make a projected image appear brighter. For example, a screen gain of 1.3 will make a projected image look 30 percent brighter than it would if the same image were projected on a screen with a gain of 1.0, or neutral. A neutral, or lower, screen gain is optimal for projectors based on DLP™ technology.

SDTVsearch for term

Standard Definition Television. Lower resolution subset of the ATSC's DTV system. 480i is typically accepted as an SD signal. Digital broadcasters can offer multiple sub-programs at SDTV quality, as opposed to one or two HD programs. Digital satellite and digital cable often refer to the majority of their programs as SDTV, somewhat erroneously, as neither system has anything to do with DTV, though both, technically, consist of a digital 480i signal.

SECAMsearch for term

: Acronym for Systeme En Couleur Avec Memoire (sequential color with memory); the color TV system used in France and throughout the Eastern Block Republics.

Sharpnesssearch for term

Gives the illusion of higher horizontal resolution by electronically altering the video signal so big light to dark transitions appear more pronounced. Technically the frequency response of the video circuits are altered so that higher video frequencies (fine horizontal details) are accentuated. Sharpness is not a focus control; it does not change the electron beam spot size. Increasing sharpness can introduce or accentuate ringing, ghost edges close to and to the right of dark to light or light to dark transitions. As a rule, sharpness should be first set to its "off" or "neutral" position and then optionally carefully adjusted to suit the viewer's personal desires.

Shimmeringsearch for term

(1) Flickering halos or pinpoints of light caused by stray light rays from imperfect rear projection screen layers, which contain lens elements. (2) Accentuated flicker of thin picture details moving up or down at certain speeds that interact with the scan rate.

Sourcesearch for term

A component from which the system's signals originate. DVD player, AM/FM tuners, and VCRs are sources.

SVGAsearch for term

SVGA is used to define a specific display resolution. Resolution is defined by the number of individual dots that a display uses to create an image. These dots are called pixels. An SVGA display has 800 horizontal pixels and 600 vertical pixels giving a total display resolution of 480,000 individual pixels that are used to compose the image delivered by a projector.

SXGAsearch for term

SXGA is used to define a specific display resolution. Resolution is defined by the number of individual dots that a display uses to create an image. These dots are called pixels. An SXGA display has 1280 horizontal pixels and 1024 vertical pixels giving a total display resolution of 1,310,720 individual pixels that are used to compose the image delivered by a projector.

Sync (Synchronisation Signals)search for term

The rate at which the picture is traced on the display device must be synchronized to the source video. There are three types of sync signals in composite video; color burst, horizontal and vertical sync.